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Disabled Dichotomy

This is a little article (i guess) that I wrote to help a friend (Andres Tapia) with his book. The book was released in February 2008 and was called "The Inclusion Paradox". But this is just something he asked me to put together regarding everyday life of a disabled person. Dont mind the blanks. I was trying to fill in my own versions of another article and I couldnt relate those parts. It is all about perspective, I guess. John

Disabled Dichotomy Daily Encounters of Being Handicapped 1. I am always the most visible person in the room unless everyone else is standing. 2. – 3. Should I need to move, I am certain to have to explain what wheelchair accessible means multiple times 4. I can be pretty sure that in my search for a new home, I will be making more concessions on features and amenities than finding the “perfect” place. 5. In going shopping, I can be certain there will be aisle blockages or items placed too high for me to reach. 6. I can be certain to get a phone call or email from a friend if they see a person in a wheelchair on television. 7. I am sure that people will assume I can’t do something much more often than they think I can. 8. Likewise, I know that even small accomplishments will be made into a bigger deal than they really are. 9. I am sure that most people think I am asexual. 10. I can be certain that people have more questions about my situation than answers. 11. – 12. – 13. I know that most people like me are struggling to make ends meet or are having a much harder time finding work. 14. I need to be concerned about being victimized because I am viewed as an easy target. 15. My children are subject to ridicule because I am viewed as incomplete by their peers. 16. – 17. If I have food on my face or am unkempt in appearance people will assume that my caretaker is slacking. 18. I can swear in public or put on a scene and people will attribute to being angry due to my situation and not due to some immediate injustice. 19. If I speak in a group setting I am speaking for everyone with an obvious disability 20. I can do well in a challenging situation to everyone’s amazement. 21. Speaking for my group is expected. 22. If I get pulled over for a traffic infraction I get a bit more lenience than other people 23. I can be certain that I will be asked for the person in charge 24. – 25. – 26. If I buy a poster containing a person with a disability I know it will have a motivational saying or a joke attached to it. 27. – 28. Things can be said inside my group that cannot be said outside of it. 29. – 30. If I declare an issue based on accessibility I know other won’t see it as a big deal. 31. I can go to a restaurant on Friday evening and be certain to not have available accessible parking yet see no wheelchairs inside. 32. When bike riding I will be asked if I compete in the “Special Olympics” 33. – 34. – 35. Answering questions on EOC always makes me nervous 36. I know that if I wear a flag on my shirt people will assume that I am a veteran. 37. If I am running late to an appointment it is assumed that I had a medical issue or a problem with accessibility 38. I know that I can always find someone who understands my condition because they know someone who is disabled. 39. I need to visit a place prior to setting up a meeting for people like me. 40. Help is always around the next corner. 41. An impossible barrier always seems to stand between me and the next corner. 42. Traveling will require special instructions to the airlines, which they may not follow. 43. I can wear sweatpants with a shirt and tie and no one cares. 44. Shoes last forever. 45. Snow, Rain, and Sand sucks. Curbs and stairs are not fun either. 46. Cobblestone sidewalks look nice but are not fun to roll over.

#disability #adaptivesports #wheelchairsports #ADA

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